“Secretly Famous is the seventh studio album for preacher/guitarist/vocalist Reverend Jimmie Bratcher, but according to Bratcher, “I really feel like it’s my first.” The Rev explores his roots with a blend of back-porch blues, grime, and hope that feels just right. Joining Bratcher on the album is Craig Kew on bass, Lester Estelle Jr. on drums, and Rick Steff on keys. Kew’s bass lines are grimy, funky, and soulful at the same time and lift this album to another level. Kew can walk and shuffle hard, but his syncopated, yet melodic bass lines create a masterfully funky groove on several tunes, most notably on “57,” which is one of the best tracks on the album. This is a good album, well worth listening to, and there’s not a single subpar track on the record. It’s progressive and hard-hitting, but also pays plenty of homage to the blues, country, and rock ‘n’ roll of days gone by. The Review: 9/10 Can’t Miss Tracks – 57 – Tobacco Road – When I Fall Apart ”
Blues Rock Review

““So what took me so long to “discover” him? He is a gifted musician with equal parts bravado, humor and gritty blues authenticity. I’m going to have to catch up by purchasing a few of his previous releases. Shouldn’t he be much more than “secretly” famous by now?””
Parcbench

““Like a drunk’s face hitting the pavement, Jimmie Bratcher is the definition of solid down of earth blues rock – with traditional nausea and hangovers excluded this time. Despite its fairly conventional nature “Secretly Famous” indeed sounds like an album drowning in its own earnestness – and this pays off in high dividends.””
Daniel Pavlica – The Rocktologist

“How often do you hear a blues artist turn out a smashing cover of a classic teen pop tune without losing a shade of their credibility? Well, the good Rev. Jimmie Bratcher has got some blues news for you. Just to make sure you know you are in the right place from the start, he kicks off Secretly Famous with a swamp-rock original called “Jupiter & Mars.” With its heavy foot-stomping rhythm and Bratcher’s full-throated bluesy vocals, the tune is an affectionate reminder of late swamp-rock guitar avatar and pioneer Johnny Jenkins. Like Jenkins, Bratcher is a strong singer whose voice is remarkably similar to that of blue-eyed-soul great Mitch Ryder. Ryder didn’t record a lot of ballads but Bratcher’s “It Just Feels Right” will give you some idea of what it could have sounded like when he did. Bratcher is a superior vocalist, rare enough in times when the importance of blues singing has been overshadowed by blues guitar playing; no objections to the guitar being in the spot”
Rick Allen – Vintage Guitar Magazine

“This is a good album, well worth listening to, and there’s not a single subpar track on the record. It’s progressive and hard-hitting, but also pays plenty of homage to the blues, country, and rock ‘n’ roll of days gone by. The Review: 9/10”
Nik Rodewald – Blues Rock Review

““This trio is unbelievably tight and the music is so in the pocket, not unlike early SRV. This, kids, is the good stuff.” – TOP TRACKS: Jupiter & Mars, Bologna Sandwich Man”
John The Rock Doctor Kereiff – Gonzo Online

“ SECRETLY FAMOUS, indeed. If the Rev. Jimmie Bratcher keeps up the quality of this music, he might not be that way for long. ”
Peanuts – Jazz & Blues Report

“I’ll be completely candid and tell you that a couple of my personal biases surfaced when I heard about Secretly Famous. I am suspicious when I see the honorific “Reverend” in use, unless the Reverend in question is a civil rights leader or at work in church (I make an exeption for Billy Gibbons’s clearly lighthearted use of the term, largely because I’m not certain he has ever self-applied the title). And the blues rockers who typically engage Jim Gaines to produce are not, in general, my cup of tea. So, despite a personal recommendation from Bratcher’s publicist telling me I would likely enjoy the new CD, I almost took a pass. I would have missed hearing a good one.”
Tom Hyslop – rockmrtom

“This one starts out with twang ‘n stomp just before The Rev. Jimmie Bratcher commences to shout ‘n testify, showin’ y’all why he’s Secretly Famous…but the reasons ain’t all that covert, dear parishioners ’cause the ingredients to his juju are plain as day: it’s everything, brothers and sisters, it’s everything, ‘n I’m here to tell ya why. Open yer hymnals to page 666, to Lord A’mighty, Doth the Right Rev Harbor Angels or Demons in His Haunted Soul?, cue the chapel organist to lay down that suspicious smelling cigarette she’s a-puffin’ on, tell them wayward souls to quit throwin’ dice over by the baptismal font, and I’ll hip you up to the lowdown.”
Mark S. Tucker – FAME

“This is a good album, well worth listening to, and there’s not a single subpar track on the record. It’s progressive and hard-hitting, but also pays plenty of homage to the blues, country, and rock ‘n’ roll of days gone by. The Review: 9/10”
Nik Rodewald – Blues Rock Review

“The Rev. Jimmie Bratcher looks like someone you might find on an East Coast college campus an intellectual hipster who reads Kant while sipping white wine. It’s all the more startling, then, that “Call On Me,” the opening track of Bratcher’s fine new album, erupts with a blast of righteously down home funk. It’s as if Ray Charles has been reincarnated in the body of a character from a Woody Allen movie.”
David FreelandDavid Freeland – Blues Revue Magazine

“ The Rev. is an honest-to-gosh man of the cloth. Bratcher brings, as one might expect, a strong gospel influence to his blues music. The Electric Rev., is entertaining and uplifting at the same time as he is one of the more unique and talented characters on the roots music scene today. ”
Mike O’Cull – Blues Blast Magazine